Fisitron's Flame

“I’d have the biggest arguments with people about the legitimacy or otherwise of fanfic. I’ve got a real issue about people who dismiss fanfic with a sweep of the hand just because it’s not official. And I find it staggering that you could be an artist—a professional artist, a professional Transformers artist—and no one bats an eye when they hear, ‘You know what, I’ve been doodling Ultra Magnus since I was eight.’ Or ‘I’ve spent ten years painstakingly drawing my favorite Transformers characters, and now my ability has been recognized and I’m doing it professionally.’ As an artist, that’s entirely normal. But if you’re a writer who expressed your love for the … Maybe I’m just airing all my personal grievances now. But you know what I mean, it shouldn’t be any different for a writer. And actually these days, surely professionals in the comics world—or beyond, but particularly comics … Dan Slott, for example. He didn’t create his first Spider-Man story when he was given the job of writing Amazing Spider-Man. Fans become pros; people have a love of things, and that encourages them to be creative, and there’s an overlap of what they love and what they write about or what they draw. It happens. But you know, fanfiction is used almost exclusively as a pejorative term; it’s used as a term of abuse. As I said, I don’t read it now, but you mentioned Telefunken—I wrote fanfic, Transformers fanfic. I’m proud of writing it; I gave it my all, as I give More Than Meets the Eye my all. And there were other writers, at the time—my contemporaries—who wrote Transformers fanfic, and they are fantastic, and the stories they wrote are fantastic. And it’s the same in other branches of fanfiction, too.”

—   James Roberts [x] (via morethansky)

(via pleasantstupidcat)

eschergirls:


maplepoutine submitted:






This is not really an Escher Girl, but the LoL cinematic trailer submission on this page made me think of this screencap of an FF XV trailer.  Notice how every male character have textured, realist skin while the two female characters have perfect pale skin with makeup on.

This is referring to a previous post where somebody brought up the lack of wrinkles or facial creases of any kind on a woman character in a League of Legends trailer, and I also posted a picture of the male and female faces in Batman: Arkham City as another example where female faces must be devoid of any lines (even expression lines) while male faces can have all sorts of interesting features and details, and can be exaggerated to give more character to the faces.

This isn’t just about women having to be portrayed as eternally young, or how women’s standards for beauty are so tied with having no lines on our faces, but it’s also incredibly limiting when designing and portraying female characters.  If all your female characters always have to have smooth round faces, no wrinkles, etc (and often big eyes and pouty lips too), then it’s going to be that much harder to try to make them look different than each other.  And if they also aren’t allowed to show lines on their faces for expressions, then it’s going to limit the range of their expression too, or they’re going to end up with a weird doll look when you do have them emote.  The point is, it can end up creating a very limited box for female character visuals, and creating characters that all look very similarly, even if you really don’t mean to. And that in turn limits how much information you can convey about those characters, visually.

eschergirls:

This is not really an Escher Girl, but the LoL cinematic trailer submission on this page made me think of this screencap of an FF XV trailer.  Notice how every male character have textured, realist skin while the two female characters have perfect pale skin with makeup on.

This is referring to a previous post where somebody brought up the lack of wrinkles or facial creases of any kind on a woman character in a League of Legends trailer, and I also posted a picture of the male and female faces in Batman: Arkham City as another example where female faces must be devoid of any lines (even expression lines) while male faces can have all sorts of interesting features and details, and can be exaggerated to give more character to the faces.

This isn’t just about women having to be portrayed as eternally young, or how women’s standards for beauty are so tied with having no lines on our faces, but it’s also incredibly limiting when designing and portraying female characters.  If all your female characters always have to have smooth round faces, no wrinkles, etc (and often big eyes and pouty lips too), then it’s going to be that much harder to try to make them look different than each other.  And if they also aren’t allowed to show lines on their faces for expressions, then it’s going to limit the range of their expression too, or they’re going to end up with a weird doll look when you do have them emote.  The point is, it can end up creating a very limited box for female character visuals, and creating characters that all look very similarly, even if you really don’t mean to. And that in turn limits how much information you can convey about those characters, visually.

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

(via pleasantstupidcat)

rorby:

MTMTE #32 feels

(via ghoulhound)

yondamoegi:

dreamsofjade:

hoganddice:

captkylej:

themaskednegro:

bowiesnippleantennae:

whatarefrogs:

JonTron just linked this image as an example of how men are stereotyped and exploited in video games I’m literally laughing out loud holy shit

for anyone who still doesn’t get it notice the background please

Fun fact: topless slave girls are COLLECTIBLES in this game.

See, the problem is that the guys objectification is empowering. You’re empowered because you’re taking advantage of the other objectified people.

Also, can my followers who like guys please comment on whether or not they find this guy sexually attractive?

nah, too much muscle. Muscle is hard… I want something soft to rest my head on! :P the only guy that i’ve ever been attracted to who has looked like this is Jason Momoa. 

I personally like muscles. I adore them. They fascinate me.
But this Conan doesn’t look sexually attractive. He looks like he’s gonna kill me - he’s intimidating and forceful. I’d better stay away from him.
If he looked like this
I’d say “Well, hello sexy.”
Objectification and sexualization don’t really depend on character’s looks, even if they use it to objectificate and sexualize. They depend on character’s purpose and agency.
A girl character can run around with her titties exposed but still could be not sexualized.

Just my 2 cents

yondamoegi:

dreamsofjade:

hoganddice:

captkylej:

themaskednegro:

bowiesnippleantennae:

whatarefrogs:

JonTron just linked this image as an example of how men are stereotyped and exploited in video games I’m literally laughing out loud holy shit

for anyone who still doesn’t get it notice the background please

Fun fact: topless slave girls are COLLECTIBLES in this game.

See, the problem is that the guys objectification is empowering. You’re empowered because you’re taking advantage of the other objectified people.

Also, can my followers who like guys please comment on whether or not they find this guy sexually attractive?

nah, too much muscle. Muscle is hard… I want something soft to rest my head on! :P the only guy that i’ve ever been attracted to who has looked like this is Jason Momoa. 

I personally like muscles. I adore them. They fascinate me.

But this Conan doesn’t look sexually attractive. He looks like he’s gonna kill me - he’s intimidating and forceful. I’d better stay away from him.

If he looked like this

I’d say “Well, hello sexy.”

Objectification and sexualization don’t really depend on character’s looks, even if they use it to objectificate and sexualize. They depend on character’s purpose and agency.

A girl character can run around with her titties exposed but still could be not sexualized.

Just my 2 cents

(via evilcleverdog)

…yep.

bookgeekconfessions:

merryweatherblue:

I took my little brother (who falls on the autism spectrum) to see Guardians of the Galaxy and after this scene he lit up like a Christmas tree and screamed “He’s like me! He can’t do metaphors!” And for the rest of the film my brother stared at Drax in a state of rapture. 

So for the last 6 days I have heard my brother repeatedly quote all of the Drax lines from the movie verbatim (one of his talents), begin studying vocabulary test words, and tell everyone he knows that people with autism can also be superheroes.

Now I am not saying that Drax the Destroyer is, or was ever, intended to be autistic. All I am saying is that it warmed my heart to see my brother have an opportunity to identify himself with a character known for his strength, badassness, and honor. And that is pretty damn awesome. 

So while I adored Guardians of the Galaxy as a great fun loving film with cool characters I can do nothing but thank Marvel Studios and Dave Bautista for finally bringing a superhero to the screen that my little brother can relate to.

Another story that brings to light why diversity matters!!! Not just race or sexuality. Movies and books should have characters that are you know…people!

(via the-greysider)

cyberlocc:

he was never heard from again, the end

(Source: hayashiwylona, via the-greysider)

This dog, lol.
eabevella:

I am very productive at work. Here is my headcanon:
People on Caminus has no animal alt mode. There are, however, turbo kitties and turbo puppies. So when Nautica found Sixshot on Salvaatan VIII, she thought he was some poor puppy being hit-and-run by some spark-less bastard.

eabevella:

I am very productive at work. Here is my headcanon:

People on Caminus has no animal alt mode. There are, however, turbo kitties and turbo puppies. So when Nautica found Sixshot on Salvaatan VIII, she thought he was some poor puppy being hit-and-run by some spark-less bastard.